Monday, March 18, 2024

Report: Detrimental Effects of Cannabis on Health


I. Introduction

This report aims to compile information on the detrimental effects of various sources on health, with a focus on recent findings regarding the impact of cannabis use on cardiovascular health.


II. Detrimental Effects of Cannabis on Cardiovascular Health


A. Overview of Recent Findings


Recent research has shed light on the potential cardiovascular risks associated with cannabis use. A study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association analyzed data from over 434,000 patients aged 18 to 74, collected between 2016 and 2020. The study found that cannabis use is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, even among non-tobacco smokers.


B. Increased Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke


The study revealed that daily cannabis smokers had a 25 percent increased likelihood of experiencing a heart attack and a 42 percent greater risk of having a stroke compared to non-users. This risk was significant even among adults at risk for premature cardiovascular disease, with cannabis use associated with nearly 40 percent higher combined odds of coronary heart disease, heart attack, and stroke.


C. Risks for Non-Tobacco Users


A separate analysis of adults who never smoked tobacco or used nicotine e-cigarettes still found a significant association between cannabis use and an increased combined risk of developing coronary heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. This suggests that the risks of smoking cannabis are not solely due to the co-use of tobacco.


D. Comparison with Tobacco Smoke


The study's lead author, Abra Jeffers, highlighted that cannabis smoke is not all that different from tobacco smoke, except for the psychoactive drug (THC vs. nicotine). This suggests that smoking cannabis has significant cardiovascular risks, similar to smoking tobacco.


E. Impact of Legalization


The legalization of cannabis in various states has led to an increase in its use. Data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) show that cannabis usage has more than doubled from 10 percent in 2007 to 22 percent in 2022. This rise in consumption has raised concerns about the potential for marijuana use disorder and the need for more regulation and public awareness of the health risks.


III. Recommendations


Based on the findings, it is recommended that:


Cannabis use should be held to the same standards as tobacco regarding health risks.

There should be more guidance for physicians on screening and counseling for cannabis use.

Public awareness efforts should be strengthened to highlight the potential future cardiovascular risks associated with cannabis use.


IV. Conclusion


The recent study provides compelling evidence of the cardiovascular risks associated with cannabis use, similar to those of tobacco smoking. As cannabis use continues to rise, particularly in states where it has been legalized, it is crucial to address the potential health risks through regulation, education, and healthcare guidance.






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